Author Topic: Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (Mad Cow Disease)  (Read 1237 times)

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Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (Mad Cow Disease)
« on: April 04, 2015, 07:51:22 AM »
BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy) is a progressive neurological disorder of cattle that results from infection by an unusual transmissible agent called a prion. The nature of the transmissible agent is not well understood. Currently, the most accepted theory is that the agent is a modified form of a normal protein known as prion protein. For reasons that are not yet understood, the normal prion protein changes into a pathogenic (harmful) form that then damages the central nervous system of cattle.

Research indicates that the first probable infections of BSE in cows occurred during the 1970's with two cases of BSE being identified in 1986. BSE possibly originated as a result of feeding cattle meat-and-bone meal that contained BSE-infected products from a spontaneously occurring case of BSE or scrapie-infected sheep products. Scrapie is a prion disease of sheep. There is strong evidence and general agreement that the outbreak was then amplified and spread throughout the United Kingdom cattle industry by feeding rendered, prion-infected, bovine meat-and-bone meal to young calves.

The BSE epizootic in the United Kingdom peaked in January 1993 at almost 1,000 new cases per week. Over the next 17 years, the annual numbers of BSE cases has dropped sharply; 14,562 cases in 1995, 1,443 in 2000, 225 in 2005 and 11 cases in 2010. Cumulatively, through the end of 2010, more than 184,500 cases of BSE had been confirmed in the United Kingdom alone in more than 35,000 herds.
There exists strong epidemiologic and laboratory evidence for a causal association between a new human prion disease called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) that was first reported from the United Kingdom in 1996 and the BSE outbreak in cattle. The interval between the most likely period for the initial extended exposure of the population to potentially BSE-contaminated food (1984-1986) and the onset of initial variant CJD cases (1994-1996) is consistent with known incubation periods for the human forms of prion disease.
Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) is a recently reported transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of bovines.

Source: CDC, WHO

Johnatanmeawn

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Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Mad Cow Disease
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2017, 10:34:50 PM »
I was thinking the same thing, and since neither had an autopsy who is to say that Mad Cow Disease is what they died from?

EvaAngeni

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Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Mad Cow Disease
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2017, 02:48:30 PM »
that's crazy. I understand   patients rights and all, but when it comes to something like mad cow disease.. an autopsy should be required.  Especially if cause of death is not certain..

EvanAngeni

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Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Mad Cow Disease
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2017, 01:47:11 PM »
Two cows are standing in a field.
One says to the other "Are you worried about Mad Cow Disease?"
The other one says "No, It doesnt worry me, Im a horse"

mrDavid

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Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Mad Cow Disease
« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2017, 04:55:47 PM »
I hope Richard wont mind my putting this here, but for those who would like to understand the history of BSE mad cow disease, a book by Richard Rhodes traces its history from the 1950s to the the time publication 1997  The book is titled Deadly Feasts.  In this book I learned that mad cow disease has been in the USA for decades.  I heard some news months ago that when the brains of people who have died with Alzheimers disease is autopsied, one university discovered that 15 of the patients actually had CJD and at another univeristy, the rate was 8 with CJD.  There is not doubt that the disease is in the US, but we dont know how prevelant it is.Linda

EvanRahmeawn

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Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Mad Cow Disease
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2017, 03:37:09 PM »
My son-in-law was in England during the late 80s early 90s. His dad was Air Force,just this last month, he received a letter from the Red Cross stating that he was placed on a list of people no longer able to give blood.They stated it was because of his being in G.B. during the Mad Cow outbreak.I didnt know the incubation period of this infection.I hope there is some way of testing for it, and will be e-mailing this page site to them.------------------
Abstain from ALL  appearence of evil. 1Thess.5:22
Gerry B.