Author Topic: Dengue fever  (Read 2754 times)

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Dengue fever
« on: April 22, 2015, 06:22:31 AM »
Dengue is transmitted by the bite of a mosquito infected with one of the four dengue virus serotypes. It is a febrile illness that affects infants, young children and adults with symptoms appearing 3-14 days after the infective bite.
Dengue is not transmitted directly from person-to-person and symptoms range from mild fever, to incapacitating high fever, with severe headache, pain behind the eyes, muscle and joint pain, and rash. There is no vaccine or any specific medicine to treat dengue. People who have dengue fever should rest, drink plenty of fluids and reduce the fever using paracetamol or see a doctor.

Severe dengue (also known as dengue hemorrhagic fever) is characterized by fever, abdominal pain, persistent vomiting, bleeding and breathing difficulty and is a potentially lethal complication, affecting mainly children. Early clinical diagnosis and careful clinical management by trained physicians and nurses increase survival of patients.
Dengue is fast emerging pandemic-prone viral disease in many parts of the world. Dengue flourishes in urban poor areas, suburbs and the countryside but also affects more affluent neighbourhoods in tropical and subtropical countries.

Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral infection causing a severe flu-like illness and, sometimes causing a potentially lethal complication called severe dengue. The incidence of dengue has increased 30-fold over the last 50 years. Up to 50-100 million infections are now estimated to occur annually in over 100 endemic countries, putting almost half of the world's population at risk.

Severe dengue (previously known as dengue haemorrhagic fever) was first recognized in the 1950s during dengue epidemics in the Philippines and Thailand. Today it affects Asian and Latin American countries and has become a leading cause of hospitalization and death among children and adults in these regions.
The full life cycle of dengue fever virus involves the role of mosquito as a transmitter (or vector) and humans as the main victim and source of infection.

The incidence of dengue has grown dramatically around the world in recent decades. The actual numbers of dengue cases are underreported and many cases are misclassified. One recent estimate indicates 390 million dengue infections per year (95% credible interval 284-528 million), of which 96 million (67-136 million) manifest clinically (with any severity of disease).1 Another study, of the prevalence of dengue, estimates that 3900 million people, in 128 countries, are at risk of infection with dengue viruses.

Before 1970, only 9 countries had experienced severe dengue epidemics. The disease is now endemic in more than 100 countries in the WHO regions of Africa, the Americas, the Eastern Mediterranean, South-East Asia and the Western Pacific. The America, South-East Asia and Western Pacific regions are the most seriously affected.
Cases across the Americas, South-East Asia and Western Pacific exceeded 1.2 million in 2008 and over 3 million in 2013 (based on official data submitted by Member States). Recently the number of reported cases has continued to increase. In 2013, 2.35 million cases of dengue were reported in the Americas alone, of which 37 687 cases were of severe dengue.

Source: CDC, WHO

Madisonmeawn

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Dengue fever
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2017, 09:18:09 PM »
"new hybrid of the dengue fever virus and gene sequences associated with hepatitis C"

Hepatitis C causes severe infection and is frequently fatal, but is difficult to catch, whereas dengue fever can cause severe but rarely dangerous infection, but is severely infectious

There will be a time when the "elites" will get a special set of vaccine shots that give them immunity to these creations released into the "wild". So while millions die an early death they will continue on ...  HCV a silent killer....

They will wonder how did I get HCV? Why do I have liver cancer?

Margaretmeawn

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Dengue fever
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2017, 06:44:14 PM »
Hawaii Department of Health confirms 10 cases of dengue fever in Big Island involving visitors, residents, CDC testing in progress.

Got this as a News Alert - will post a link.

EvanAngeni

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Dengue fever
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2017, 01:50:17 PM »
My staffs eight year old daughter nearly died a couple of months ago. I recall doctors in the Caribbean telling me that unlike other infections that build immunity, dengue fever is worse the second time and usually fatal the third. And, now that Ebola seems somewhat contained, we can start worrying about the virus du jour, Zika.

EvanRahmeawn

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Dengue fever
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2017, 02:32:22 PM »
Is that the one with little white rings on its legs??
..I think its the same one we have where I live in Hong Kong. There is regular adverts on the TV here warning you and advising to keep areas clean and avoid stagnant water as KP has said.

I understand that Taiwan got hit hard a few years back with a massive increase in Dengue fever. They have since been working hard to get rid of it.

Nasty little buggers